Pay stub requirements

Pay stub claims are also becoming common allegations in class actions because the requirements are numerous and unknown to most employers. The California Labor Code specifies 9 things that must be included on each pay stub:

  1. gross wages earned;
  2. total hours worked (except for employees exempt from overtime requirements);
  3. number of piece-rate units earned and any applicable piece rate if the employee is paid on a piece-rate basis;
  4. all deductions, provided that all deductions made on written orders of the employee may be aggregated and shown as one item;
  5. net wages earned;
  6. the inclusive dates of the period for which the employee is being paid;
  7. the name of the employee and the last four digits of his/her social security number or some other employee identification number other than the social security number (as of 1/1/08, employers may only use the last four digits of the employee’s social security number for identification purposes);
  8. the name and address of the legal entity that is the employer; an
  9. all applicable hourly rates in effect during the pay period and the corresponding number of hours worked at each hourly rate by the employee.

If the required information is not put on a pay stub, penalties for the violations are $50 per employee for the initial pay period in which a violation occurs and $100 per employee for each violation in subsequent pay periods. Employees can also get attorneys’ fees and costs if they file a lawsuit.



Pay stub requirements
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